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READING THE TBR, DAY 57: the princess saves herself in this one (2017) by Amanda Lovelace

Rarely do I read poetry. Rarely have I ever. Dickinson. Plath. The Romantics. Shakespeare’s Sonnets. The quotes that kick off your more literary-type novels.

One time I read an e. e. cummings poem at a wedding. It was beautiful. 

So perhaps I am unqualified when I say that this little collection doesn’t feel much like poetry. It’s more stark sentences — some of them profoundly powerful and upsetting, it must be said —
written
on
different
lines
to make
it
seem
like
there
is
more
substance
to
them
than there is.

In fact, if these poems were not spread across multiple lines, this 99-page book would be a 3-page pamphlet. If it was lucky.

Certainly, there is an art to minimalism. And there can be no doubt that I was affected by more than one of these feminist reflections and/or dark journal entries. Some of it is inspiring. Some is very clever. And doubtless, a talent for economy of words is to be praised. Conveying complex emotions in just one short sentence is difficult, and admirable.

But for the most part, this collection feels less like poetry and more like
homework
that
has
a
page
count
and
look
I
did
it!

e. e. cummings lowercase is employed throughout — or is it just Millennial txtspk lowercase now? And then:

everyone i love leaves.

That is one poem in its entirety. Is that technically a poem? I don’t know.

But it made me feel something, and I suppose that is all that poetry, that art, is supposed to do. So in that regard, this collection mostly succeeds. It made me feel, and many of the things it made me feel were visceral and profound.

But it also made me feel kind of ripped off. And I don’t think that is the purpose of poetry at all.

SCORECARD

TBR DAY 57: the princess saves herself in this one by Amanda Lovelace
GENRE: Poetry, Feminism
PUBLISHED: 2017
TIME ON THE TBR: 1 year.  
PURCHASED FROM: It was a Christmas gift.
KEEP: Yes.

Published inTBR

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